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Poster: merryjerry1 Date: Feb 20, 2014 3:16am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: HST


Today marks the LargestSingleDigit anniversary of HST’s passing.

Here are a few things he had to say about the Dead (all taken from 'Fear and Loathing in America: The Brutal Odyssey of an Outlaw Journalist, the Gonzo Letters, Volume II, 1968-1976'):

‘…I’m trying to learn to play the flute because it strikes me that most of today’s real literature pops up in music instead of in fiction or even personal journalism. For instance at the moment my writing room is full of ‘New Speedway Boogie’ by the Grateful Dead. It says more than anything I’ve read in five years.’ From a letter to Carey McWilliams at ‘The Nation’, Nov. 23, 1970

‘If the Grateful Dead came to town, I’d beat my way in with a fucking tire iron, if necessary. I think ‘Workingman’s Dead’ is the heaviest thing since ‘Highway 61’ and ‘Mr. Tambourine Man’…’ Note: in the same letter he also listed this album as Raoul Duke’s fourth favorite album of the ‘60s and listed it as being made by ‘Warlocks et al.’ From a letter to John Lomabardi at Rolling Stone, Dec. 11, 1970


And this nice little tidbit from a June 1972 letter to Jann Wenner: ‘…McGovern could pick up a million or so votes by inviting the wire-service photographers to come out and snap him lounging around on the beach with a can of beer in his hand and wearing my Grateful Dead T-shirt.’

And there’s plenty more out there. I even remember him writing (I believe it was in ‘Songs of the Doomed’ but it's not at hand right now) that Jerry Garcia could be fielded as a Presidential candidate!

And HST in a photo dated from '63, right at the cusp of psychedelia (Incidentally, on Letterman, Garcia said the '60s peaked from '64-'67 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ss-i2VgcPw and Hunter expressed similar sentiments in his writing)...


This post was modified by merryjerry1 on 2014-02-20 11:13:44

This post was modified by merryjerry1 on 2014-02-20 11:16:41

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Poster: c-freedom Date: Feb 20, 2014 3:44am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: HST

America... just a nation of two hundred million used car salesmen with all the money we need to buy guns and no qualms about killing anybody else in the world who tries to make us uncomfortable.
-Hunter S. Thompson

"Freedom is something that dies unless it's used."
HST

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Feb 20, 2014 6:41am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: HST

Jerry's thoughts on the 60's peak is mirrored almost exactly by Ken Kesey as seen in "Magic Trip", the complete release of the film shot during the Pranksters bus trip across country in 64 (IMHO a must see). When they return from the trip back to San Fran, Kesey becomes aware of just how much had changed in such a short period of time and that the true innocence of the hippie movement had been lost amid a flood of folks into San Fran more in search of drugs than enlightenment.

My favorite moment, however, is when Furthur rolls up on Timothy Leary's compound in NY. Nice description from the University of Virginia Library "The Psychedelic 60's":

"Leary had set up the Castalia Foundation to explore the psychological and spiritual complexities of LSD use, and the Institute was located on the grounds of a mansion owned by William Hitchcock, a colleague of Leary's at Harvard. The Prankster Bus rolled up the long driveway unannounced, the Pranksters throwing green smoke bombs from the roof, blasting their crude music, and shouting from the windows. The visit was not the communal success Kesey had imagined. Leary briefly met the Pranksters, sat on the bus for a few minutes, and then retired to his room. The following day, the bus roared off and headed west."

Really shows the division between East Coast vs. West Coast (in general terms of course) that carried over way past that time. During my time following the boys, there seemed to be a feeling the West Coast was the mellow, hipster side and the East Coast was the preppy, college kid side. Based on what I saw, there seemed to be at least some validity to that view.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Feb 20, 2014 9:55am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: HST

is there a search function for that UVA library stuff? I couldn't find it but am working on stuff so didn't really delve into it. I want to find info on someone I know quite well, Charles Rumsey, who was a fixture at Millbrook and with the Hitchcock brothers.

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Poster: SomeDarkHollow Date: Feb 20, 2014 10:05am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: HST

The page I reference is https://explore.lib.virginia.edu/exhibits/show/sixties/walkthrough/leary

The library main page is: http://www.library.virginia.edu/, search function is at the top of the page. I tried "Charles Rumsey" and it came back with a few scientific publications.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Feb 20, 2014 10:30am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: HST

When I met Barlow, we had a long chat about Uncle/Cosmic Charlie (he is also a longtime rancher in Wyoming):

By whatever route they came, the supplies were an essential part of life at the New England estate. The Millbrook community developed group LSD sessions, led by a guide who orchestrated lights, musical tapes and readings. After some hours of meditation and exhortation, the group would flourish little hand mirrors in front of their faces, seeing '... lives past, and lives we might yet live in the present'. The sessions, on up to 800 micrograms per person, ended with a walk in the woods and a simple meal.
Hitchcock, the patron of all this, could hardly remain isolated from happenings at the big house. He was turned on to LSD by Alpert, eventually taking it over fifty times in the next few years, as well as a wide range of other drugs from cocaine to heroin. The man about Wall Street found it was 'a tool for the process of growth. I wanted to share the experience and further the movement.'

It meant (among other things) the introduction of friends such as Charles Rumsey, a lawyer. A nephew of Averell Harriman, a leading American politician, Rumsey is said to have become a missionary for LSD among the Manhattan set and New York sent many new disciples to Millbrook—for the experimental weekend workshops. Even breakfasts were designed to be part of the experience. The scrambled eggs were green, the porridge was purple and the milk black. The visitors sat down hesitantly and tried manfully to cope with this sudden assault on their conventions.

http://www.druglibrary.net/schaffer/lsd/books/bel2.htm

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Poster: merryjerry1 Date: Feb 20, 2014 11:30pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: HST

Yeah, they did a terrific job with that film. It was also interesting to see the footage with Kerouac, who clearly wasn't comfortable in the company of the Pranksters.

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Poster: ColdRain108 Date: Feb 21, 2014 9:14am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: HST

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-G_OdTgsu40

at 1:08 the bus is Furthur

at 1:36 it is Further

I noticed it the first time I watched the movie, the wrong spelling got corrected right away (literary guy spell checking the stoned pranksters) but somehow that stupid spelling is what gets dragged along through history...or was it that Bob and Phil could use that name w/o having to pay Kesey any royalties.

The whole Furthur thing is just plain lame!

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Feb 21, 2014 8:48am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: HST

I'm not sure Kerouac was comfortable with anyone's company at that point in his soon to be over life